Nutty Banana Smoothie
By Rylee Baisden

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Nutty Banana Smoothie

This nutty banana smoothie has eleven (11) ingredients and it tastes just as good as it looks!

So, I’m the Smoothie Queen in my household and even though I put a lot of ingredients in my smoothies, they always taste so good! Generally, I keep my base as oat milk and always put in a bit of frozen fruit -- peaches in today's recipe. I usually put lots of greens in my morning smoothies but, today I wanted something a little different so this recipe features peanut butter, banana and peaches.

 

Nutritious smoothie ingredients

Peanut butter, banana and peaches are a great combination of flavors that can be turned into a smoothie recipe. The ingredients in this smoothie will give you plenty of protein, potassium, carbohydrates and vitamins to power your workout or any other activity.

The benefits don't stop there though! Peanut butter is full of healthy fats which help improve cognitive function, maintain muscle mass and boost metabolism. Bananas provide additional potassium with their high levels of the mineral while also containing magnesium which aids in sleep regulation and assists with energy production. Lastly, peaches provide vitamin C for immune system support and prevent oxidative damage to cells during exercise.

Peanut butter and banana is a common combination for a smoothie. The banana provides carbohydrate energy, while the peanut butter has protein. Protein is good for building muscle and repairing cells that have been damaged during a workout. 

Peanut butter is also an excellent source of vitamin E, niacin, riboflavin and magnesium. These vitamins are good for the growth and repair of muscles during workouts. Vitamin E helps protect against muscle spasms. [1]

Peanut butter smoothies may also be a good post-workout meal because they help replace glycogen stores. Glycogen is what gives the body energy. This helps keep people feeling strong and energized  rather than tired and sore.

The high amount of calories in peanut butter smoothies makes them an option at any point during the day when a person wants to have a quick snack that will restore energy without taking too much time.

The protein content of peanut butter smoothies also helps keep people feeling full longer. This can help them avoid overeating later.

On the other hand, peaches provide fibre and sugar that can help give people quick energy for their workouts. It also helps give people energy by releasing sugar into the bloodstream immediately rather than waiting for it to be digested.

Peaches are also a good source of vitamins B1, C, E, K and folate. These vitamins help support muscle health and recovery from workouts. [2]

Folic acid helps reduce the side effects of a workouts and protect against cardio vascular disease. [3]

 

This smoothie is really easy to make since I just needed to peel the banana and peach before putting them in the blender. Try it out and let me know what you think. Personally, I think it’s delicious!

Ingredients

 

 

Method 

 

  1. Simply put all of the ingredients into a blender and blend it up!

 

 

Download this recipe here

This nutty banana smoothie is a great way to start your day. Perfect after you've done one of my workouts!

References

[1] El-Hennawy, Adel S, and Salwat Zaib. “A selected controlled trial of supplementary vitamin E for treatment of muscle cramps in hemodialysis patients.” American journal of therapeutics vol. 17,5 (2010): 455-9. doi:10.1097/MJT.0b013e3181b13c8f, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19829096/.

[2] Beals, K. A., and V. L. Fulgoni. "Consumption of peaches, plums and nectarines is associated with better nutrient intakes, improved anthropometric measurements, and reduced risk of hypertension in NHANES 1999–2002." Journal of the American Dietetic Association 105.8 (2005): 61. https://jandonline.org/article/S0002-8223(05)00971-5/abstract

[3] Molina-López, J., Molina, J.M., Chirosa, L.J. et al. Effect of folic acid supplementation on homocysteine concentration and association with training in handball players. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 1010 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-10-10

 

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